News Releases

Shanu Markand with poster
From left: Salma Ferdou and Shanu Markand with poster, “Ocular parameter changes in the IRBP knockout mouse eye."

May 26, 2016

Emory Eye Center Postdocs Honored at Emory Research Symposium

(ATLANTA) Emory Eye Center’s postdoctoral research scientists placed among the top honorees at the May 19, 2016, Emory University School of Medicine 9th Annual Postdoctoral Research Symposium.  This symposium featured work from more than 100 postdoctoral fellows from the Emory campus.

Shanu Markand, PhD, whose work was recently honored at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2016 Annual Meeting, was among nine selected oral presenters at the symposium. Her topic, “Changes affecting visual acuity in the IRBP knockout mouse eye, [with Natecia Baskin, Sara A. Wetzstein, Ranjay Chakrabory, Priyanka Priyadarshani, Kevin J. Donaldsn, Jeffrey H. Boatright, Machelle T. Pardue and John M. Nickerson] “in which she discovered early light-independent changes in the size of the eye that result in profound myopia and subsequent retinal degeneration in mice lacking a vitamin A binding protein. Markand, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of and is mentored by Emory Eye Center’s Professor of Ophthalmology and Vice Director of Research John M. Nickerson, PhD, who is co-director and investigator in the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics (Bioanalysis) Core laboratory.

Chelsey Faircloth, Robin Schmidt and Sarah Gooding
From left: Chelsey Faircloth, Robin Schmidt and Sarah Gooding discussing the posters."

Postdoctoral Fellow Robin Schmidt, PhD’s, poster, “Embryonic chick retinal cell cultures:  a model for Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration (LIRD) [with Nathaniel F. Henneman, Preston E. Girardot, Sarah W. Gooding, Priscila P. Cunha and Jeffrey H. Boatright] won in the Best Poster Presentation category. As one of nine selected for this honor, Schmidt’s research tested the hypothesis that “…light exposure can induce cell death in ECRCs [embryonic chick retinal cells] and this light-induced death can be prevented by treatment with neuroprotective compounds.” Schmidt is mentored by Jeffrey H. Boatright, PhD, who is co-director and investigator in the Functional Genomics and Proteomics Core Laboratory and professor of ophthalmology in Emory Eye Center’s Research (Basic Science) Section. "

Ying Li's image, Interstellar
Ying Li's winning image, titled "Interstellar," of a genetically modified retina ganglion cell that is expressing a fluorescent jellyfish protein. These cells are sending their axon to the optic nerve head connecting the retina to the brain. These retinal ganglion cells are the retinal cell type that is selectively affected by diseases such as glaucoma. The image was taken using a Nikon confocal microscope housed in our National Eye Institute-funded core facility.


In the Best Image Award competition, Postdoctoral Fellow Ying Li, PhD, placed third for her image, "Interstellar," of a genetically modified retina ganglion cell expressing a fluorescent jellyfish protein (above).  Li is mentored by Eldon E. Geisert, PhD, who is co-director and investigator in the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics (Bioanalysis) Core laboratory and professor of ophthalmology in Emory Eye Center’s Research (Basic Science) Section.  Li’s image was featured on the cover of the research symposium’s booklet, in the posters displayed at the symposium, and in promotional materials.

IMAGE RIGHT, FROM TOP: Ying Li receiving her award. BOTTOM: Li, Geisert and Postdoctoral Fellow Felix Streubing, PHD, in the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics (Bioalanysis) Core laboratory at Emory Eye Center.

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